Flood Reduction Practices Eligible for 90 Percent Cost Share

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Through the Iowa Watershed Approach statewide program, qualifying landowners can receive up to 90 percent cost-share assistance to implement small-scale flood mitigation practices.

Across the state, the Iowa Watershed Approach (IWA) is working with landowners and other stakeholders to implement watershed projects to reduce flooding and improve water quality. The program focuses on nine watersheds (Dubuque/Bee Branch, Upper Iowa, Upper Wapsi, Middle Cedar, English River, Clear Creek, East Nishnabotna, West Nishnabotna, and North Raccoon).

Participating IWA watersheds

Participating IWA watersheds

Local stakeholders and volunteer landowners within the qualifying areas will be considered for 90 percent cost-share assistance to implement in-field and edge-of-field conservation practices that offer flood reduction and water-quality improvement benefits. Eligible conservation practices include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Wetlands
  • Farm ponds
  • Stormwater detention basins
  • Terraces
  • Sediment detention basins
  • Floodplain restoration
  • Channel bank stabilization
  • Buffer strips
  • Saturated buffers
  • Perennial cover
  • Oxbow restoration
  • Bioreactors
  • Prairie STRIPS

The 90 percent cost share is a recent increase from the original 75 percent. The landowner will cover the remaining 10 percent or through local match. Conservation practices will meet all NRCS specifications and guidelines. For more information, contact Kate Giannini at kate-giannini@uiowa.edu or 319-335-5233

The IWA is a five-year project to minimize flood risk in Iowa that began in 2016. This approach builds upon other Iowa programs designed to reduce flooding and improve water quality, such as the Iowa Flood Mitigation Program and the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy.

The Iowa Watershed Approach is a $97M statewide program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The success of the IWA depends on collaborative partnerships among many statewide organizations and local stakeholders who together will carry out the work necessary to achieve the program goals. Partners include, but are not limited to: Iowa Economic Development Authority; Homeland Security and Emergency Management; University of Iowa; Iowa State University; University of Northern Iowa; Iowa Department of Natural Resources; Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship; cities of Coralville, Dubuque, and Storm Lake; and many Iowa counties.

For more information, visit the IWA website at www.iowawatershedapproach.org.